Fibre in Vegetables
 
Fibre in vegetables is good for us and it is an essential dietary requirement. If your diet is too low in fiber, then gradually increase your intake. If you increase it too rapidly it may cause a stomach upset and flatulence.
Fibre in vegetables helps the body to eliminate waste products. It keeps the intestinal tract / bowel movements regular, therefore, preventing constipation. There are two types of fibre which are soluble fiber and insoluble fiber: Soluble and Insoluble
 
Vegetables
 
Healthy Foods Index
 
Vegetable Fibre

Soluble: this type slows down the amount of carbs absorbed - found foods such as apples and oats.

Insoluble: this type aids the digestive system as it adds bulk and absorbs water.


Fibre isn't a nutrient as such but it is still an essential part of a healthy diet as it aids the digestive system and encourages it to function properly by helping food to move through the gut. The bulk is required to enable the food to pass through the body smoothly and comfortably - hence a lack of fiber can result in constipation and hard, uncomfortable stools!

Because the fibre in vegetables absorbs water, as it requires water to soften stools, it is very important to drink sufficient amounts of water every day.

 
 
Vegetable Fibre List

Almost all vegetables contain a source of fibre, however, some veggies have higher amounts than other. The following Fibre in Vegetables list provides only the vegetables with highest fibre, the ones that are richest in this essential dietary requirement:

Avocado
Beans
Beetroot
Black-eyed Peas
Broccoli
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Carrot
Chick Peas
Cucumber (particularly good as cucumber is approximately 90% water)
Eggplant
Fennel
Green Peas
Kale
Lima Beans
Mushrooms
Potato (particularly the skin)
Pumpkin
Peas
Peppers
Rhubarb
Spinach
Sweet Potatoes (particularly the skin)
Turnip Greens
Yam

 
 
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